The port of Gaillac 1863

Port of Gaillac 1863

Port of Gaillac 1863The Port of Gaillac 1863 shows the port at the zenith of its activity, with over 200 gabarre (barges) registered.

The Port of Gaillac 1863 shows the port at the zenith of its activity, with over 200 gabarre (barges) registered. 

1863 was the year before a rail link to Toulouse started its decline

The painting was specially commissioned for and is on display at the Museum “InVINcible VIGNEron” at Broze near Gaillac

By Gordon Frickers, this painting measures 2,000 X 1,000 cms (6′ 6” ″ x 3′ 3”″), oils. Its replacement value is £ 25,000.

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A timeless painting will give you pleasure every time you see it upon your wall

A painting that hangs comfortably with the finest collections.

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The Port of Gaillac 1863, art in progress.

The Port of Gaillac 1863, art in progress.

The painting 

Unusually this picture was painted at the museum in the foyer it was intended to eventually grace, thus picture was for many months a ‘happening’, an added attraction at the museum.

The Port of Gaillac 1863” was for long centuries at the navigable head of the River Tarn hence giving it’s name to the regional wines and  typical of an up river port in South West France for the period 1820 to 1865.

1863 was the year before the first steam train arrived at Gaillac, the river traffic was at its height, with over 200 barges (gaborre) registered at the Captainerie.

Many people followed, the adventure, visitors and world wide audience via social media in particular Facebook and Twitter and my blog, people as far away as the USA and Australia.

This ongoing event helped establish the new museum, both locally and nationally in France.

The original idea came to me while I was thinking of sailing upon the capricious river Tarn.

The idea appealed to Theo Elzinga as an appropriate center piece for the foyer of the new wine museum he was building at Broze near Gaillac in SW France.

You can discover via the ‘main text’ link on this page how the port was researched including a few discoveries that surprised even the experts and the page details how the painting conceived and created.

 is typical of a port up river from Bordeaux in France for the period 1850 to 1865.

 I chose the date when the river traffic was at its height, with over 200 barges (gaborre) registered at the Captainerie, a year before the first steam train arrived at Gaillac. 

You can purchase or commission a painting like this via ‘Contact Us’ page or our ‘Payments‘ page using Paypal, or bank to bank

By arrangement payments can be in installments.

Contact Us.

T: + 44 (0)1865 52 2435 or Skype ‘gordonfrickers’

Email: info@nullartfrickers.com

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Further reading Main Text. ~ With this page you can discover much of the ‘lost’ history of the port gain an insight into the research and methods that made this much acclaimed painting

You are cordially invited to follow The Art of Gordon Frickers on his blog and  www.facebook.com/gordonfrickers

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23.02.15 Gordon Frickers © updated 24.06.15, 23.02.16, 27.08.2016, 14.02.2017, 24.03.2017, 22.05.2018 

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